New in 2019: King of the Tightrope: When the Great Blondin Ruled Niagara

illustrated by Adam Gustavson (Peachtree, 2019)

Many thanks to Elizabeth Bird @ Fuse #8 Productions and School Library Journal for hosting the official cover reveal on Blondin’s 195th birthday, February 28th. Click here.

Book Summary:
Jean-François Gravelet was a French tightrope-walking prodigy who grew up on the rope and became famous as a child. But routine performances became too dull, too boring, too ordinaire. Not even fame was enough to satisfy his artistic yearnings. He imagined more dramatic and exciting feats that nobody had ever done. It took a fateful trip to Niagara Falls in 1858 to spark his most creative idea—to perform on a tightrope over the raging Niagara River. But how could he engineer a massive rope across the 1100’-wide river, keep it from snapping, and keep himself from plunging into the deathly current? The Great Blondin needed an engineering process, determination, and a belief that what he could imagine, he could accomplish. Magnifique!

King of the Tightrope is packed with STEAM connections and references the challenges of historical research.

Check out the Testimonial Blurbs:
“Growing up as a high wire walker, I frequently heard stories about Blondin’s feats of audacity.  I am pleased that through this book Blondin’s legacy will live on, not only in the circus community, but within the general public, young and old alike.” —Alessandro  Wallenda, The Flying Wallendas

“Blondin constantly endeavored to overcome his own mental and physical limits. He is exemplary in this respect and deserves great admiration. That is why Donna and I have dedicated so many years of our lives in writing his story. Bravo l’artiste!” —Jean-Louis Brenac, great-great-grandson of The Great Blondin

 Coming Soon:
* The fascinating research journey that revealed perpetuated falsehoods and required consultation with engineers
* Curriculum guide (it’s gonna be fabulous!)
* Book trailer
* Hands-on activities with STEMS connections. Here’s one to get you started—make your own balancing tightrope walker as shared by The Experimentals.

Photo credit to Wikimedia Commons—public domain.

See more photos at bottom of this page

QUOTATION SOURCES:
“To cross those roaring waters became the ambition of my life.” Berton, Pierre. Niagara: A History of the Falls, Excelsior Editions (State University of New York), 1992. Pg 124.

“All this was done with the agility of a squirrel and in no apparent fear.” The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, June 28, 1859.

“There be one American Falls and one Canada Falls. When Blondin falls, there be one French Falls.” Daily Gazette, July 7, 1859.

“Arrangements (for his funeral) are actively going on.” Daily Milwaukee News, June 24, 1859.

“He went out on the small rope until he came to the large one.” The New Era, August 7, 1858.

“Gentlemen, anyone what please to cross, I carry him on my back.” New York Tribune, July 1, 1859.

“Leave us a lock of your hair to remember you by.”

“marched on at a lively pace, his toes hardly appearing to touch the rope.” Review, March 9, 2002.

“My frens, I have got safely over. I hope you will remember me.” Buffalo Daily Republic, July 1, 1859.

“You are as great as the Falls themselves!”  Toronto Globe, July 4, 1860.

“You can see that I am even great.” Toronto Globe, July 4, 1859.

”The Great Feat has been Successfully Performed.” Daily Gazette, July 1, 1859.

“It is useless: you cannot describe Blondin, any more than you can describe Niagara; both are stupendous and baffling.” National Magazine, 1861.

“In utter amazement we inquire, what will Blondin do next?” The Daily Gazette, July 4, 1859.

SELECT SOURCES (Click on links to read a few of the primary sources):
“A Chat with Blondin.” New York Tribune, August 12, 1888, page six. 
“An Exciting Scene. M. Blondin’s Feat at Niagara Falls.” New York Times, July 4, 1859.
Berton, Pierre. Niagara: A History of the Falls. New York: State University of New York Press, 1992.
Brenac, Jean-Louis. (great-great-grandson of Blondin, France), various email interview communications. 2016, 2017, 2018
Brenac, Jean-Louis. Blondin: The Hero of Niagara, Volume One. Unpublished, undated manuscript. Accessed 2016-2018. Electronic.
“M. Blondin’s Tight-Rope Feat.” New York Daily Tribune, July 1, 1859.
“M. Blondin Crosses the Niagara River on a Tight Rope.” Buffalo Daily Republic, July 1, 1859.
“Mons. Blondin—The Rope Walker—Daring Feat of Walking Down one of the Guys to the Suspension Bridge.” The Buffalo Daily Republic, June 4, 1859.
“Mons. Blondin’s Great Feat.” Buffalo Courier, July 1, 1859.
Strand, Ginger. Inventing Niagara: Beauty, Power, and Lies. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2008.
“The Cable Stretched—Mons. Blondin Astonishes the Spectators with a Daring Feat.” Buffalo Daily Republic. June 24, 1859.
“The Feat at Niagara: Tight Rope Dancer Walking Across Niagara Falls on a Cord.” New York Herald, July 3, 1859, page two.
“The Great Feat at Niagara.” Evening Star (Washington, DC), July 6, 1859.
“The Prince of Wales in Canada and the United States.” London: Bradbury & Evans, 1861 page 264-267. Accessed via Library of Congress. (In 1860, the Prince met Blondin during his Canadian and American tour and witnessed Blondin carrying a man on his back and then walking on stilts over the Niagara River. Read the account.)
“Walking on a Tight Rope Over the Niagara River.” The Gazette (Montreal, CA), July 14, 1859.
“Walking on a Tight Rope Over the Niagara River.” New Era, July 8, 1859.

Photos top row:
The approximate spot of Blondin’s rope from the New York side of the river
My visit to Blondin’s grave in Kensal Green Cemetery in London
A lucky shot of the cover with a rainbow mist
Photos bottom row:
Researching materials at the Niagara Falls, N.Y. Public Library
Some of the rope used in my research
A tribute to The Great Blondin over the street in front of Tussaud’s Wax Museum-Canada side
Imagining Blondin’s original plan to stretch his rope between Terrapin Point (N.Y.) and Table Rock